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Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Paruku IPA and Rangers

The Paruku Indigenous Protected Area (IPA) borders the Great Sandy and Tanami deserts and is south of Halls Creek. Covering around 430,000 hectares it includes a collection of wetlands known as Paruku (Lake Gregory). Paruku has several groups of Traditional Owners, including Walmajarri, Jaru and Kukatja peoples and was dedicated as an IPA in September 2001.

Paruku's spectacular wetlands are an internationally renowned haven for thousands of birds. Paruku is the only lake in the region with a reliable source of fresh water for large numbers of birds and other animals, supporting over 70 species of waterbirds and 175 aquatic species. More than 100,000 birds visit the wetlands regularly, with up to 60,000 at Mulan Lake (the largest waterbody) at any one time.

The Paruku Rangers work closely with their elders to ensure that knowledge is passed down to the younger generations, so they know their land and cultural stories. The rangers primarily manage tourism impacts associated from visitors who use the Canning Stock Route. They also manage feral horses, cattle and camels, carry out biodiversity surveys, organise on-country trips and help care for cultural sites.

State: 
WA - Kimberley region
Project Website: 
http://www.parukuipa.org.au/
Administration Organisation
Kimberley Land Council
http://www.klc.org.au/
Paruku Indigenous Protected Area and Rangers. Photo: © Kimberley Land Council
Paruku Indigenous Protected Area and Rangers. Photo: © Kimberley Land Council